7-Eleven
7-Eleven
7-Eleven
7-Eleven
7-Eleven
7-Eleven
7-Eleven
7-Eleven

7-ELEVEN PROTOTYPES

BatesForum has designed four 7-Elevens across the nation. Each design is a prototype, attempting to provide successful solutions to the client’s development needs.

BatesForum has designed four 7-Elevens across the nation. Each design is a prototype, attempting to provide successful solutions to the client’s development needs.

A project in Dania Beach, Florida, had an initial 10% projected success rate based on a 3rd party due diligence report. Two previous teams had attempted to deliver this project prior to BatesForum. Once BatesForum and their trusted partners were onboard they worked diligently with the city and county to come to a design that would fit within the jurisdictional requirements and appease the neighborhood community. The result was a mid-century modern C-store and fuel canopy that relates to the surrounding context in the area and meets 7-Eleven budget and design performance criteria.

The 7-Eleven project in Sachse, Texas, is a Ground-Up C-store with a standalone fuel canopy. Being close in proximity to 7-Eleven HQ in Irving, Texas this store is being utilized as a prototype development store for a new interior finish package, menu display for fresh and ready foods, and new equipment unveiling including the new 4-barrell Slurpee machines, a 7-Eleven staple.

The city of Naples, Florida, had long desired to redevelop the property located at 499 Goodlette Road. The site backs up to a local canal and neighboring community that needed an immediate, walkable amenity such as a 7-Eleven. The project has become one of the favorite designs by developers and 7-Eleven project managers and is being reviewed for other potential sites across the country in specific areas looking for a high-design.

Lastly, one of the components to the success of the 7-Eleven program is the development of projects on small tracts of land where competition cannot deliver. The 7-Elven project in Tamarac, Florida, utilizes the “Homeplate” prototype which gets its name from the diamond shape of the Homeplate in baseball. The project was delivered on time and on budget against strict entitlement issues in the South Florida market historically known for delaying development timelines.

*Originally designed by Bates Architects